Can Hackers Post Sexy Pictures & Videos In My Facebook Wall?

Can hackers post sexy pictures & videos in my Facebook wall? That’s what these Facebook posts claim. They have been circulating for years, claiming that you need to share them to block hackers from posting dirty pictures and videos on your Facebook wall, or your friends’ Facebook wall. Does that really work?

This Facebook post claims that it will prevent hackers from posting dirty pictures and videos in your name in the walls and profile of your friends.
This Facebook post claims that it will prevent hackers from posting dirty pictures and videos in your name in the walls and profile of your friends.
This Facebook post claims that hackers are posting dirty videos and pictures on your wall, and that sharing it will somehow protect you.
This Facebook post claims that hackers are posting dirty videos and pictures on your wall, and that sharing it will somehow protect you.

 

Of Course, NOT!

The short answer is NO. If a hacker has access to your account, simply sharing a picture will not stop him / her from posting anything on your wall, whether it’s a cute picture of a Minion in girl’s clothes, or a “dirty picture“. Neither will sharing such a post block the hacker from accessing your account.

If you think you have been hacked, change your password immediately, and enable 2-step authentication in your Facebook settings (if you have not already done so). Don’t waste time sharing such pictures. They are worthless.

Frankly speaking, a hacker who gains access to your account will not waste time posting dirty photos or videos. What is the point in doing that? The hacker would much rather harvest your personal photos, videos and information for sale, if not defacing your Facebook wall for the lulz.

 

Why Do People Create These Posts?

These posts are designed to generate Likes and Shares for Facebook pages and groups. You can read all about the cost of liking and sharing such posts in this Tech ARP article – The Price Of That Like Or Share On Facebook.

Basically, unless you know the website or Facebook page / group and want to support their articles or posts, DO NOT like or share them.

 

But Someone Is Definitely Posting Dirty Pictures / Videos On My Wall!

If you notice unknown posts appearing on your wall, as if posted by yourself, it’s usually not a hacker. This is particularly true if they are posts of clickbait videos. Those are often malicious Facebook apps masquerading as “interesting videos”.

What usually happens is the user clicks on the “interesting” video, and accidentally agrees to let the app post on the Facebook wall. The malicious app then acts like a virus, posting the same or similar “interesting videos” on your Facebook wall to entice your Facebook friends to click on them as well.

Take a look at some examples of clickbait posts that can conceal a malicious Facebook app :

A sexually-explicit clickbait post (censored by us) that entices the Facebook user to accept the malicious app.
A sexually-explicit clickbait post (censored by us) that entices the Facebook user to accept the malicious app.
A sexually-explicit clickbait post (censored by us) that entices the Facebook user to accept the malicious app.
A sexually-explicit clickbait post (censored by us) that entices the Facebook user to accept the malicious app.
Another highly suggestive clickbait post (censored by us) that entices the Facebook user to accept the malicious app.
Another highly suggestive clickbait post (censored by us) that entices the Facebook user to accept the malicious app.

Not all are sexual in nature. Take this example of a Robin Williams clickbait post. It is fake, of course, and you won’t be shown any video of Robin Williams actually saying goodbye with his phone camera. All they have to do is get you to agree to let them post.

This Robin Williams clickbait post appeared right after his suicide.
This Robin Williams clickbait post appeared right after his suicide.

 

 

How To I Remove Such Malicious Apps?

Fortunately, Facebook has made it easy to remove such malicious apps. To make it easy for even those who are not tech-savvy to remove these apps, we wrote a step-by-step guide called How To Stop Facebook Apps Posting To Your Facebook Wall.

 

Legit Apps Can Ask To Post On Your Behalf

There are many legitimate apps that ask to post on your behalf, so don’t be afraid of every app that asks to do this. You must be aware of why an app would want to do this.

Let’s take the Change.org app for example. When you sign a petition, it will ask you to allow them to receive certain information from your Facebook account. This allows them to authenticate your identity as well as make it easier for you to sign future petitions.

A legitimate app asking for permission to read your information.
A legitimate app asking for permission to read your information.

The Change.org app will also request to share publicly on your Facebook wall the petitions that you sign, to encourage your family and friends to sign them too. Note that Change.org specifically asks this in a separate screen, and does NOT make it mandatory. If you wish to skip this, you can click Not Now.

A legitimate app asking for permission to post on your behalf.
A legitimate app asking for permission to post on your behalf.

A malicious Facebook app would try to hide the fact that you are signing over the right to post publicly on your Facebook wall, or make it mandatory to continue. This is why the bait is very important. If the video is something that greatly interests the user, he/she will likely agree to let the app post publicly on their Facebook wall without much thought.

Legitimate Facebook apps can also get irritating after some time. So if you wish to remove their right to post on your behalf, you can change their app permissions. You can find out how to do this in our step-by-step guide called How To Stop Facebook Apps Posting To Your Facebook Wall.

If you find this post informative, please share it with your family and friends!

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